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gbaldwinod@gmail.com - 11/2/2018 3:36:11 PM
   
Geometrical Optics
Friedrich Schiller, in his 27 letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man(kind), stated that play is the act of balancing abstract thoughts regarding what should be, with our perceptions of what actually is. He stated that it is necessary for the determination of beauty, defined as the connection between the actual, and the ideal which is unknowable in its entirety. It is with this sense of play that William Brown, PhD, introduced geometrical optics during my freshman year of optometry school in 1979. This aesthetic education encouraged further playful construction and deconstruction of content and form for nearly four decades. These resulting 93 geometric figures contain labeled points that maintain their significance until noted otherwise. In order to visualize axial ratio equalities using triangles, the optic axis is represented as a circle of infinite radius, and the sign convention is unnecessary. Please follow this link to the attached figures: https://university.envisionus.com/EnvisionUniversity/media/University-Media-Library/Baldwin-Geometrical-Optics.pdf

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Gregg Baldwin - 3/24/2019 9:17:49 AM
   
RE:Geometrical Optics
It is self-evident that parallel lines divide a circle into equal arcs. From this it can be shown that equal arcs subtend equal angles anywhere on a circle; and that certain triangles within a circle can therefore have the same shape, with their sides forming ratio equalities. Quadrilaterals with corners along the same circle can then describe equalities with multiple ratios. In 1667, Isaac Barrow used this to find triangles using other triangles, describing tangential refraction along a line and at a circle. After a presentation of this material, axial ratio equalities representing various components of total axial magnification are illustrated on an optic axis described as a circle of infinite radius, encouraging a spatial understanding devoid of jargon and sign convention. Off-axis prism and crossed-cylinder problems are then approximated using parabolic surfaces.

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gbaldwinod@gmail.com - 9/30/2020 11:00:53 AM
   
RE:Geometrical Optics
Friedrich Schiller, in his, “Twenty Seven Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Mankind,” stated that play is the act of balancing abstract thoughts about what could be, which what actually is. He stated that it is necessary for the determination of beauty, which he defined as the connection between the actual and the ideal. It was with this sense of play that William Brown, PhD, introduced geometrical optics during my freshman year of optometry school in 1979. This aesthetic education provided for the continued construction of context out of the free interplay of content and form, as well as over four decades of fun.
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