Visibility Vol 14 Issue 1, 2020


Patient and Caregiver Post-Stroke Visual Concerns


Approximately 800,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year. As the number of older adults increases, it is expected that the number of people with strokes will also increase. Almost two-thirds of stroke survivors have some visual problems adversely affecting their overall function. Visual impairments which can occur following stroke include low vision, eye movement and visual field abnormalities, and visual perceptual difficulties. Although visual field abnormalities may be chronic or resistant to care, other visual impairments can be corrected and respond well to care. Visual issues may be subtle or overlooked when prioritizing care for a stroke survivor. To maximize patient function, it is imperative that a thorough vision evaluation be performed and targeted invention initiated. To provide optimal care, it is important for healthcare providers to understand how stroke survivors and their caregivers experience visual concerns after stroke.

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Assessment of online patient education materials designed for people with age-related macular degeneration

Jennifer Fortuna, PhD, OTR/L; Linda Shuster, PhD, CCC-SLP, F-ASHA; Anne Riddering, PhD, OTR/L, CLVT, COMS; Cassie Lopez-Jeng, PhD, MPH, CPH, CHES

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Minding the Gap: Determining Causes for Missed Low Vision Referrals to Develop a Streamlined, Sustainable Low Vision Rehabilitation System in Wisconsin

Katherine Dalzotto MD; Mark Banghart MS; Christina Thomas-Virnig PhD; Sanbrita Mondal OD

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Assessment of Modified Patient Education Materials for People with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Jennifer Fortuna, PhD, OTR/L; Linda Shuster, PhD, CCC-SLP, F-ASHA; Anne Riddering, PhD, OTR/L, CLVT, COMS; Cassie Lopez-Jeng, PhD; MPH, CPH, CHES

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